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Heating Oil Spill Cleanup Using the Small Spill Kit

Heating Oil Spill Cleanup Using the Small Spill Kit This post is a case study about the cleanup of a heating oil spill using the small spill kit by Custom Biologicals. The small spill kit is designed to clean up a number of small petroleum spills such as; heating oil spills, diesel oil spills, gasoline spills, and motor oil spills. The small kit contains Custom HC. Custom HC is a bioremediation product containing billions of petrophilic (oil eating) of specifically selected, beneficial bacteria. Case Study Heating Oil Spill Cleanup Client Category: Emergency response – heating oil spill Location: Pennsylvania Problem: 275 gallons of heating oil located in the basement were spilled when an automobile struck the building. The basement was a dirt surface and about 900 square yards were affected. TPH levels ranged from 3500-9800 ppm. Custom Treatment: The recommended dosage of Custom HC was applied directly on the dirt basement floor. Bio-nutrients were also added. Custom Results: The following averages were obtained after six weeks of treatment. Hydrocarbon Testing Site 1 Before –  3500 ppm TPH After – 63 ppm TPH Hydrocarbon Testing Site 2  Before  – 9800 ppm TPH After – ND (non-detectable) As of the date this case study, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (PA...

FAQ’s about Bioaugmentation of Wastewater

FAQ’s about Bioaugmentation of Wastewater Frequently asked questions about the bioaugmentation of wastewater. Q. What is bioaugmentation? A. Bioaugmentation is simply the addition of specifically selected microorganisms (mainly bacteria) to wastewater. When properly implemented bioaugmentation of wastewater will improve the performance of the plant. Q. I’ve heard about using “bugs” and bioremediation but isn’t that just snake oil? A. In the past, there were a lot of snake oil salesman peddling magic bacteria that could do wonderful things at treatment plant. Bioaugmentation companies had a reputation worse than that of a sleezy lawyer. The myth continue because treatment plant operators normally have a background in engineering, not biology. The wastewater engineers found very little math to evaluate wastewater treatment bacteria. So instead of bioaugmentation, most industrial and municipal wastewater treatment plants used polymers and chemicals to treat their wastewater problems. Q. So what can bacteria and bioaugmentation really do? A. First, its important to remember that bacteria are alive. They have certain nutrient requirement that they need to live, grow, and reproduce. Here’s a quick list of the most important parameters: Dissolved Oxygen – Greater than .5mg/L Temperature – 50-95 degrees F. pH 6-9 Ammonia 1-3 mg/L Phosphate .5-2 mg/L Yes, a wastewater treatment plant can operate out side...

The Role of Bacteria in the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Process 3

The Role of Bacteria in the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Process 3 Industrial Wastewater Treatment Enzymes in biochemical reactions act as organic catalysts. The enzymes become part of the reaction but are not themselves changed by the reaction. This is done by first the enzyme and the substrate coupling forming and enzyme-substrate complex. After the reaction is complete, the enzyme is released for catalyzing another reaction. Okay, so now we have some general information about the biochemical reactions of bacteria and their enzymes. However, these chemical reactions occur within all bacteria, not just those in industrial wastewater and sewage treatment. So lets get back to the subject at hand – the role of bacteria in the industrial wastewater treatment process. All bacteria, useful or otherwise, in a flow of industrial wastewater got there by happenstance. They remain, eat and reproduce because there is a food supply available to them. Remember bacteria have only thing on their mind; live, grow and reproduce. They are completely unconcerned about the quality of their workmanship as determined by your wastewater laboratory chemist. Since it’s true that almost all industrial wastewater treatment plants are designed to take advantage of one of natures essential resources, the decomposition of organic material by bacterial activity, then we should...

The Role of Bacteria in the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Process Part 2

The Role of Bacteria in the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Process Part 2 Here’s the next part of our series on bacteria in the industrial wastewater treatment process. The typical growth rate curve of a bacterial culture, known as the bacterial growth rate curve, is a result of the four following phases of bacterial growth: The Bacterial Growth Cycle Lag Phase (Sometimes called initial phase). When bacteria are first introduced into an environment, little growth will take place until they adapt to their new environment. In fact, it generally takes several generation times before the bacterial numbers begin to significantly increase. In practice, the lag phase typically lasts three hours or longer.  Log Phase (Logarithmic Phase). Once full growth and cell reproduction is underway, the bacterial growth curve develops the log phase. This is the phase where the bacteria are rapidly dividing. This phase is limited by the food source and waste buildup. Stationary Phase. This phase occurs when some bacteria are growing and reproducing while others are dying. The actual number of living, viable organisms will remain fairly constant. Death Phase (Sometimes called log death phase). After a period of time, the environment becomes loaded with bacterial waste products, food supply is depleted, and the entire system begins to...

The Role of Bacteria in the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Process

The Role of Bacteria in the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Process In general, an area that is largely misunderstood in industrial wastewater treatment is the role played by bacteria, both indigenous and applied via bioaugmentation. With few exceptions, most industrial wastewater treatment of organic compounds  is intended to take advantage of the natural processes of wastewater treatment bacteria. Bacteria may be aerobic, anaerobic or facultative anaerobes. Aerobic bacteria require oxygen to perform their metabolic functions and reproduce. Anaerobes cannot live and reproduce in the presence of oxygen. Facultative bacteria have the ability to live either in the presence or absence of oxygen. For the purposes of our discussion, we’ll talk about aerobic bacteria and discouraging or controlling the anaerobes. In the typical industrial wastewater treatment facility, air is added to improve the metabolism and functioning of the aerobic bacteria. This addition of air is also done to enhance the aerobes at the expense of the anaerobes. A number of factors are controlled at an industrial wastewater treatment plant. All of them with the idea of improving the environmental conditions for the native bacteria. Conditions that are sometimes controlled are: Settling pH Temperature Agitation Aeration Introduction to Bacteria Bacteria may be classified in a number of ways like size, shape, genus,...
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